I wish I could say I'm sad to see it go, but

It’s been years but I can still smell the inside of the building.

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Interesting article!

When you think about that little corner of the valley, say, north and east of East High school, not a lot changed between the early 1900’s and World War II. But after the War, it all changed very dramatically.

Research Park took over the area where Fort Douglas has once staged war games.

The LDS church expanded “This is the Place Monument” to Heritage Park.

Hogle Zoo gobbled up a portion of Emigration Creek gulch.

The University Hospital was constructed way up on the hillside, and that system now occupies the entire hillside

The University Campus spread into every unoccupied spot on formerly empty Fort Douglas land

The Veterans Administration created the VA Hospital, and eventually expanded to a very large section of what had formerly been empty FD land,

University housing expanded as far east as Foothill and Sunnyside

Countless formerly empty residential lots were suddenly occupied by VA funded homes

New, expensive residential developments were created and filled to capacity north and east of Federal Heights, and the City Cemetery, as well as East of foothill and north of the Bonneville Golf Course.

I grew up in, and have lived most of my life in and around that area. When I was young, in the 60’s, it was an afternoon hike from my house to the cement U on the hillside. Now, you can drive to a home that sits up on the hillside with the U in essentially their backyard.

Today, there is virtually no empty land north and east of East High school, until you get to the Shoreline trail. I guess I’m older than I think and feel, as I’ve watched most of it happen, and still recall vividly how different that little corner of the world was as far back as the early 60’s.

A favorite memory:

Sometime in the 1960’s, there used to be a retired military airplane sitting off the northwest corner of Foothill and Sunnyside, on the corner of what was then Fort Douglas. On our way home from fishing trips, my father would always stop and let my brother and I play in the plane for 10 or 15 minutes. It was always the highlight of the trip :slight_smile:

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this communist era structure needs to be next

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As a Health Promotion & Education major I spent a lot of time there.
Change is good/well needed!
Hope they don’t eliminate the habit of Kinesiology majors wearing shorts though…:wink:

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The psych building and the medical towers on the east side are horribly run down. The annex was pretty embarrassing how bad it was particularly in light of what is an amazing campus. So many great buildings and an unrivaled setting. Progress is good.

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They say that smell is more closely associated with memory than any other sense.

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It is an unrivaled setting - I’m always surprised when I show up for the first basketball game of the season at the huntsman center to look to the west at what is a spectacular view of the downtown area, the Avenues, and Capital Hill.

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The annex…reminded me of Harmony Church, Ft. Benning.

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I lived right across he street from where that airplane was (long gone by my time). Great spot to grow up

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I worked in the Psych (SBS) building for 7 years. FYI the building was originally designed to be cladded in red brick like the surrounding buildings but was left in the Soviet Style concrete after budget cutbacks.

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I always thought the SBS was horrific - and it is - until I visited Simon Fraser U near Vancouver. 400+ acre, 35K student campus atop Burnaby Mountain… just about the most gorgeous setting imaginable… but it consists entirely of Soviet style grey concrete buildings. Bizarre and nauseating.

https://www.alamy.com/stock-photo/simon-fraser-university.html

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